Author Topic: oversized chip  (Read 8552 times)

mom4jessi

  • TDA Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4
oversized chip
« on: March 16, 2011, 12:14:46 PM »
blinds are 100/200, action gets to the small blind who doesnt say anything but throws out a $1k chip to go with the $100, is this a raise or a call?

Nick C

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 3345
    • http://www.pokertda.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=557;sa=forumProfile
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2011, 02:44:54 PM »
It is a call. The rule for a single oversized chip, is only a call without declaring a different amount. Usually the player will at least take out their 100 chip, this might help explain their intentions. If the player did have intentions of raising to 1100, next time they will remember the lesson learned. Remember, it is the responsibility of the player to make their intentions clear.

Stuart Murray

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 645
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2011, 03:19:33 PM »
hi mom,

it's a call,  the chips that are already in as blinds count as the pot and not the players bet, in many European cardrooms we sweep all the blinds and antes in before the hole cards are dealt.

Regards
Stuart

JasperToo

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 328
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2011, 08:00:51 PM »
Stuart,

Does pulling the blinds early really alleviate the problem?  I mean in the case mentioned it wouldn't change the way the rule is applied, it would still meet the one chip rule whether.  Though, I will grant you that if the player throws the one chip out and the PULLS the blind back it makes it a little bit clearer that he meant to call.  But then maybe not.

I don't like the blinds pulled early because the UTG player always seems to not understand when it's his turn.


Stuart Murray

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 645
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2011, 04:11:14 PM »
Hi Jasper,

Pulling the blinds and antes in is not to form the pot as they are pulled into a position infront of the dealer, The main reason we pull everything in before dealing is when using 'slide' dealing where we need a clear table in order to deliver the cards quickly and cleanly, obviously this does not create a problem when 'pitch' is used as the dealer can deliver the cards over the top of blinds and antes.

With regards to players not understanding what is happening when the blinds are swept in I generally find it increases players awareness of what the action is and where.

Regards
Stuart

JasperToo

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 328
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2011, 06:02:17 PM »
...
With regards to players not understanding what is happening when the blinds are swept in I generally find it increases players awareness of what the action is and where.

Regards
Stuart


I suppose the difference in our experience in this regard is that it is not a standard thing in most of the rooms here and so people just aren't generally used to it.  In one of the rooms here, depending on the blind structure (ring games not tourney's) they will leave the blinds out in some and pull them in others.  There is always a bit of confusion in the games that they are pulled.

The difference in style of deal is interesting and completely obvious once you reminded me, thanks.

Nick C

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 3345
    • http://www.pokertda.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=557;sa=forumProfile
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2011, 06:08:25 AM »
Stuart,
 Great explanation. I have a question for you; Have you ever considered "pitching" cards as oppossed to "slide dealing?" Is it by choice or do you have some ruling that forbids it?

 

Nick C

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 3345
    • http://www.pokertda.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=557;sa=forumProfile
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2011, 07:38:15 AM »
mom4jesse,
 You should look at another post that relates to this one.

http://www.pokertda.com/forum/index.php?PHPSESSID=hfguflav21s1oafc77jqa3qfa3&topic=347.0

Brian Vickers

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 454
  • Poker Manager
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2011, 10:01:08 AM »
Stuart,
 Great explanation. I have a question for you; Have you ever considered "pitching" cards as oppossed to "slide dealing?" Is it by choice or do you have some ruling that forbids it?

 

It's because pitching is so dreadfully uncivilized   ;D

Stuart Murray

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 645
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2011, 11:50:09 AM »
ha ha, so funny, yeh, sliding cards is a European way used by croupiers mostly.  I comes about from increased game security by sliding rather as pitching as the deck is always in contact with the table in plain view, there are many unlicensed poker dealers who pitch and the american influence does increase the use of pitching with most untrained dealers pitching.  On a poor surface, or limited size I will pitch and toss, but on a full size table I always slide, it's faster easier and leaves less scope for things to go wrong, or as Brian says, pitching is rather uncivilized by comparison.

Stuart

WSOPMcGee

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 334
    • The R.O.P.E.
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2011, 01:51:50 PM »
ha ha, so funny, yeh, sliding cards is a European way used by croupiers mostly.  I comes about from increased game security by sliding rather as pitching as the deck is always in contact with the table in plain view, there are many unlicensed poker dealers who pitch and the american influence does increase the use of pitching with most untrained dealers pitching.  On a poor surface, or limited size I will pitch and toss, but on a full size table I always slide, it's faster easier and leaves less scope for things to go wrong, or as Brian says, pitching is rather uncivilized by comparison.

Stuart

Where did this topic go so wrong??? LOL - Headline is Oversized Chips are we're all talking about dealing styles...... hahahahaha!  :D

Another curious question Stuart: Is there no concern for dealers covering up the deck when slide dealing? I've watched several "punters" (that's what we call'em) and they cover the top of the deck completely with their hand. In the States, players go ape if you cover the deck.
@wsopmcgee on Twitter

Stuart Murray

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 645
Re: oversized chip
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2011, 04:57:33 PM »
ha ha, indeed this thread has certainly went off track, myself, and most others that are 'trained' in the art of sliding will be pinkie under deck, thumb and two middle fingers at either side of the stub for side support and index finger only on top, using index and first middle of other hand to slide the cards off, that's the way I and most other do it, there will more than likely be plenty who do it wrong covering the deck thinking they know how to slide.

Regards
Stu