Author Topic: Table Tests for New Dealers  (Read 6673 times)

K-Lo

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Table Tests for New Dealers
« on: April 10, 2012, 03:14:31 AM »
I've been out of the live action scene for a while now so I'm a bit out of touch...  If you're hiring new dealers that you haven't trained in-house and will be giving them a table test as part of their interview, is there a specific format that you use or specific tasks that you make sure you always get them to do?  I'm sure it depends on the games that they will be expected to deal and so forth, but I was hoping to get some broader feedback on some best practices.  I have seen some informal auditions where they simply put the dealer on the table to start dealing in a live game for 5-10 minutes and that's it, and other situations where the dealer would be quizzed one on one with the manager or floor person on rules of different games, rake, cash and rack management, etc.

Thanks!

Nick C

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Re: Table Tests for New Dealers
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2012, 04:54:03 AM »
K-Lo,
 Allowing a new prospective dealer to audition in a live game is one way, but it's a little risky and I only recommend it for dealers with prior casino experience. I think a formal audition with several floorpersons seated at the table telling the dealer what game to deal is better. It only takes a very short time to recognize whether the dealer has the mechanical skills and dexterity required to perform the basic skills of the shuffle and the pitch. When I was auditioning dealers, I was always interested in their experience as a player. Asking for change of a $100 bill, and asking what the nut high and low hand would be (after the flop, and again after the turn, and finally after the river), was a good quick way to get an idea of how much additional training would be required. There were times that I would lean in the direction of favoring the person with more experience of the game over another with better mechanics.

Spence

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Re: Table Tests for New Dealers
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2012, 03:55:07 PM »
All good points by Nick. Especially about previous playing experience.
I always do an assessment of rule understandings outside of the mechanics. Can they talk me through an irregularity, or button progression or whatnot. Then they would sit down and deal a round or so to see if they have any flow to the game and are able to follow the action. Once that is established we move on to forced scenarios or role playing by the instructors. This guy is the angle shooter. That guy plays out of turn. This guy talks about/shows his hand to others. If they can control the game then for the most part they should be passable and floor ready.
I recently had a dealer completely botch his table test so I gave him a week to get up to speed and solidify on the things he was shaky on. We retested him and he had some improvement but as stll falling a bit short. I decided to try him on a live game for half an hour an he was fantastic. Don't forget that some people don't test well as will make themselves look like fools in the training room but have the capacity to be excellent when surrounded by your guests. I am not saying that everyone should get a shot on a live game but if you are having your doubts then it might be worth a shot. (especially if you really need the staff)

Nick C

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Re: Table Tests for New Dealers
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2012, 04:15:29 PM »
Spence,
 All of what you say is right on. I will take a wild guess and say that the potential dealer you are trying to bring up to snuff is, very personable, pleasant, neat in appearance...etc., etc,. or you wouldn't be giving him extra time. I always tell my students, when the time comes for their audition, there is no such thing as overdressing.
I also tell them that they can not be discriminated against for color, gender, or age, to name a few. However, if they walk into an audition chewing gum, or smelling like an ashtray, or have a tattoo of a swastika on their forehead...they probably won't get hired.

K-Lo

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Re: Table Tests for New Dealers
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2012, 07:54:51 AM »
Thanks guys, this is helpful.

So do you just come up with the forced scenarios on the fly, or do you employ a set list of things that you need to evaluate?

Nick C

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Re: Table Tests for New Dealers
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2012, 05:15:41 PM »
K-Lo,
 I prefer a set list that would reveal chip handling, knowledge of nut hands as I mentioned. Things like rake procedures vary from casino to casino so I'll deal with that possibly on one more final interview before they are hired. I was involved with a group that tried so many dfferent set-up scenarios that it defeated the purpose of what they were trying to accomplish. They removed 2 or 3 cards from the deck and asked the dealer to fan the cards, pushed improper amounts into the pot when betting, acted out of turn, etc., etc. It got to the point where I didn't even know what to expect.
  I want to give you one word of advice that is worth mentioning. I worked for a casino years ago and when the auditions were completed we made our selections, only to discover that 3 of the 7 dealers that we wanted to hire could not clear a background check! Remember, a drug test before the audition is not required. Don't make any snap decisions.

Spence

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Re: Table Tests for New Dealers
« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2012, 04:18:59 PM »
The forced scenarios are really going to be of your choosing and how you weigh your evaluations. In no particular order you should have one of your players start the action on a these examples
  • Multi-way side pot action.
  • Minimum raise, especially concerning short all-ins.
  • "Accidentally" moving the button further
  • Prematurely opeing their cards
  • Refusal to open hand/Showdown order
Those are a few I need to know that my dealer can handle. Whether it is as simple as calling a supervisor to deal with the issue or they can handle it themselves I need to know that they are confident with these archetypes.