Author Topic: 2-4 holdem all in question  (Read 2616 times)

classicjaycsc

  • TDA Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3
2-4 holdem all in question
« on: June 05, 2011, 03:03:17 PM »
This is after the flop. Player A Bets 2.  Player B goes all in for 3.  What can player C do?  if Player C wants to raise.  Raise to 5 or just complete the raise to 4.

Nick C

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 3080
    • http://www.pokertda.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=557;sa=forumProfile
Re: 2-4 holdem all in question
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2011, 06:04:00 PM »
Welcome to the forum,
 In a limit game the all-in player's wager is 50% of the full raise (two dollars), so it is considered a raise and is part of the raise limit for that game. The option to the next player is to fold, call the $3 all-in or raise to $5, they can not just complete the bet.

Spence

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 355
Re: 2-4 holdem all in question
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2011, 08:37:17 PM »
This 50% rule applies to all limit games. If you move up to a 5-10 game and a player is all-in on the turn for $8 then the next raise is $18. No-Limit games tend to use differing rules dependant on where you play. It's a good idea to familiarize yourself with the house's no-limit raising rule before your get involved in a big pot.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2011, 04:03:13 PM by Spence »

Nick C

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 3080
    • http://www.pokertda.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=557;sa=forumProfile
Re: 2-4 holdem all in question
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2011, 06:44:37 AM »
Spence,
 Your example (5 and 10 limit) is for the $10 betting round, so the option you listed is for a RAISE to $18, not a bet because the next player can just call the $8 all-in. I will go back to the original limit game (2 and 4). On the $2 betting rounds (pre-flop and after the flop) players must bet $2 and can only raise in incriments of $2....so with a three raise limit the cap on a $2 betting round is $8, the initial bet ($2) and three raises. A better example to help you understand the raise rules for limit games is on the $4 betting rounds. Lets say that Player A initiates the $4 bet on the turn and the next player goes all in for a total of $5. The option to the next player is to call the $5 or complete the raise to a total of $10 (because the $1 raise from the all-in was less than 50% of the required amount). Same situation; Player A bets $4 and the next player goes all-in for a total of $6 or $7 (both are 50% or more of the required raise amount), the options to the next player are to call the $6 or $7 all-in, or make a full $4 raise above the all-in amount. They can not complete the bet to $8 because the increase from the all-in player is recognized as a full raise. Limit games usually have a 3 or 4 raise limit, so the all-in player can affect the "cap" for a betting round.
 I would like to see this raise rule applied for no-limit, IMO, it is much easier to understand. Spence is correct when he says "It's a good idea to familiarize yourself with the house's no-limit raising rule before your get involved in a big pot."

classicjaycsc

  • TDA Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Re: 2-4 holdem all in question
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2011, 06:57:47 AM »
Thanks for the answers just one more question.  After the Turn in 2-4 game.  Player A goes all in for $1 what can player B do?

Nick C

  • TDA Member & Veteran Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 3080
    • http://www.pokertda.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=557;sa=forumProfile
Re: 2-4 holdem all in question
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2011, 10:23:55 AM »
Call the $1 or make a complete bet of $4 because the all-in was less than 50% of the required $4 bet.

classicjaycsc

  • TDA Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Re: 2-4 holdem all in question
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2011, 02:09:33 PM »
thanks.