Author Topic: Must a player speak up if his bet is misinterpreted and action follows?  (Read 1405 times)

MikeB

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This topic is subject of the following thread:
http://www.pokertda.com/forum/index.php?topic=1259.msg10913#msg10913

Does "Player C" have an obligation to speak up if his bet is misinterpreted? What if substantial action occurs on the mistake?

Dave Miller

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Re: Must a player speak up if his bet is misinterpreted and action follows?
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2016, 06:49:24 PM »
I am somewhat outspoken on this topic in that other thread.

Aren't players supposed to know the rules? Aren't players who make mistakes, or merely incorrect assumptions doing so at their own risk? If a player acts upon incorrect information, why is a player who could benefit from that mistake required to say something? Isn't that the dealer's job? If the dealer fails to speak up, maybe the dealer needs to be replaced.

Oh, sure, if there is the potential of exposing a board card prematurely, or shipping a pot to the wrong player, etc., all players who recognize the error should speak up.


Must a player speak up if his bet is misinterpreted and action follows? I say no.
Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown.
But how much does it cost to knock on wood?

Nick C

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Re: Must a player speak up if his bet is misinterpreted and action follows?
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2016, 10:34:52 PM »
Dave,

 Why wouldn't you speak up if you know a mistake is about to be made? 

Uniden32

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Re: Must a player speak up if his bet is misinterpreted and action follows?
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2016, 10:13:16 AM »
Must a player speak up if his bet is misinterpreted and action follows? I say no.

I feel that a player has an obligation to protect their actions.

This includes ensuring that their bets and raises are clear and understandable.

Anytime a player decides to not adhere to this philosophy, they leave the decision up to the TD as to what their action is.  They shouldn't be surprised nor upset when they don't agree with the TD's interpretation.  They had every chance available to them to be clear as to what their action was, yet made the choice not to.

Isn't that the dealer's job? If the dealer fails to speak up, maybe the dealer needs to be replaced.

Most TDs that I know aren't the one's that are responsible for hiring/firing dealers.  We have to work with what we've been provided.

Ralph Brandt
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Isle Casino - Pompano Beach, FL
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Dave Miller

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Re: Must a player speak up if his bet is misinterpreted and action follows?
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2016, 10:18:29 AM »
Dave,

 Why wouldn't you speak up if you know a mistake is about to be made? 
As I explained in the other thread, at least twice, speaking up only once it is my turn to act gives me a slight advantage.

In general, if a player is about to make a mistake, I want to give him that opportunity, so that I can get a better read on his intentions. Not correcting the mistake, gives me a better read on the next player, etc.

And, in a somewhat abstract way, any player who says anything while there is action pending to another player, could be violating the "don't talk about the hand during the hand" rule, and/or the "one person to a hand" rule.


Must a player speak up if his bet is misinterpreted and action follows? I say no.
I feel that a player has an obligation to protect their actions.

This includes ensuring that their bets and raises are clear and understandable.

Anytime a player decides to not adhere to this philosophy, they leave the decision up to the TD as to what their action is.  They shouldn't be surprised nor upset when they don't agree with the TD's interpretation.  They had every chance available to them to be clear as to what their action was, yet made the choice not to.
I also mentioned this in the other thread: What if the player in question didn't realize there was a mistake until the action came back to him?
Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown.
But how much does it cost to knock on wood?