Author Topic: What does the declaration "bet" mean when facing a bet or blind?  (Read 6834 times)

BillM16

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Re: What does the declaration "bet" mean when facing a bet or blind?
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2015, 09:37:24 AM »
NickC:

I totally agree.  A player should not be able to say "bet" and expect it to constitute a "raise." The existing rules seem to make clear that use of a standard term constitutes a binding action and that non-standard usage should not result in a contrary action.  Verbal is always binding unless chip(s) hit the table (beyond the betting line) first.  Furthermore, assuming verbal was binding as described in my scenario above, clearly those chips should not stay in the pot as a legitimate poker bet cannot be made after calling, folding, or checking.  Of course, these discussions offer great opportunities to improve the simple clarity of the rules.

BillM16

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Re: What does the declaration "bet" mean when facing a bet or blind?
« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2015, 10:49:24 AM »
Correction: calling is of course a legitimate bet ...

Nick C

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Re: What does the declaration "bet" mean when facing a bet or blind?
« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2015, 02:00:50 PM »
Bill:

 One of the problems (another one, I should say) that I always have is the Player that is misled by another player, or the dealer. If a dealer tells me it's $100 to call, I almost always assume (that's why we should never assume) that the dealer is correct and if I follow his lead, I'd like the right to retract my action if the dealer was wrong. Whether a player were skipped, or the amount was incorrect. However, the rules do not support my way of thinking. This is one of my biggest disagreements with Accepted Action...I'd rather correct the action and allow the misinformed player, a chance to correct his action, as long as another player has not acted behind him. Sometimes forcing a player to leave his chips in the pot does not feel right, or is not in the best interest of the game. This is what I was referring to when I said it depended on the situation. I guess this is when we get the chance to use good old TDA #1 ;D

 Each situation can be similar, yet may call for a different decision based on, the players intent, the action of another player, the misinformation from the dealer, or any number of other scenarios. You will also realize that the great majority of the time, you will not be a witness to the miscue...you will have to make your decision based on second hand information from your dealer, and then the players!  ::) Good luck with that! "I said raise before the chip hit the table!" "No you didn't!" "Come on dealer, you heard me...didn't you?"    FLOOR...FLOOR